Quick thought: Don’t forget UGC is not just for extreme weather

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With the recent spate of extreme weather in the US, UK and Ireland, User Generated Content has featured everywhere and there have been some amazing captures. There’s nothing new about this, everytime we experience a bad bout of weather news organisations go into overdrive seeking out content from their communities.

Although a lot of news organisations are working with their communities all the time, reaching out, curating, collaborating and encouraging them to contribute content, many are still only using UGC sporadically.

Good UGC practice is not about having an upload function built into an app, setting up a dedicated email address or using social channels to gather content it is centred on good community management. Imagine what your community might contribute if you worked with them all the time.

Image credit: David Thompson/Flickr 

Read All About It – Social Media, Citizen Journalism, iPad and US Presidential Press Corp

Here are links to four articles that I think are worth reading.

First off, some interesting analysis of research carried out by Pew on the types of stories consumed on various new media platforms versus ‘traditional’ media.

It seems to me that news organisations will have to take a different strategy with each platform if they are going to succeed on it. You can’t adopt a one-size-fits-all approach, which is bad news for budgets and resources. If new platforms continue to emerge how can news organisations adopt a successful platform-neutral approach?

Next up, here’s a nice post from Kimberly Wilson (follow her on Twitter @kimberly_wilson) about crowd-sourced websites. She has reviewed six examples  (from Washington DC, Chicago, Minnesota, Canada, Grand Rapids, and Sonora and Tuolumne County).

Yesterday, Peter Preston had a piece in The Observer about the iPad and newspapers. His thesis is that iPads won’t be the saviour as some have enthusiastically predicted, more just one small revenue stream. He uses numbers and anecdotal evidence to support this theory and asks some good questions along the way.

Finally, Brian Stelter has an article in the New York Times about the decreasing number of journalists travelling with the US president when he goes on trips. The obvious downside mentioned is that news when he’s outside of Washington DC is now coming from fewer and fewer sources.

Have you seen any interesting articles about the industry?

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