In charts: New report for CIRCOM Regional on social media and community in regional European broadcasters

Over the past few months I’ve been researching a report for CIRCOM Regional, the association of regional public service broadcasters in Europe. It has just been published at CIRCOM’s Annual Conference, held this year in Croatia. The report, all 93 pages of it, examines the social media and online community activities of 39 regional stations across 31 different countries, from the perspective of the user.

It has been a fascinating piece of research to carry out and shows that stations across the continent are using social media and interacting with their audience in quite different ways. You can read the report in full on the CIRCOM Regional website. Here are a few charts that show the broad picture of regional station’s engagement with the key social platforms:

Twitter

Twitter-Regional

 

Twitter-time-frame

{Above: Year regional stations joined Twitter}

Facebook

Facebook

Facebook Join
{Above: Year regional stations joined Facebook}

YouTube

YouTube


YouTube join
{Above: Year regional stations joined YouTube}

Instagram

Instagram join
{Above: Year stations joined Instagram}

Instagram type{Above: Type of activity from regional stations on YouTube}

Interactions and user generated content

interactions

Interactions type

{Above: Types of interactions}

There’s a lot in the report, it looks at trends across the region as well as briefly examining each station. It has been a most enlightening exercise for me and I believe a relevant document for anyone with an involvement, or interest, in broadcasting, regional or otherwise, in Europe right now. Full report available here.

Three simple thoughts on … community

Recently, I’ve seen some fairly savvy organisations do some not so savvy things when it comes to community so I thought I would jot down a few very simple thoughts on the topic.

  1. Remember you are not building a community you are facilitating an existing one. If your goal is to “build/grow” community around your brand/organisation, make sure you take a person (better still more than one person) who you think is an existing member of your community and work through what they need or what facilities an online community could provide this person.  Make sure there is going to be something in it for them individually as members of the community.
  2. As a brand/organisation you are not the community. Think about it like a party,  you (the brand/organisation) are akin to the room where the event is being held and the person facilitating the event. Remember this at all times.
  3. Continuing with that analogy from point 2, as the facilitator you need to help to get conversation started (no one likes a party where the only person talking and contributing is the facilitator/host). Entertain your community (a party without some amusement would be pretty boring, why would anyone turn up?). Finally, if you think you’re going to have a fairly boisterous community, treat it like a boisterous party – lay down some rules, reward good behaviour and eject the trouble makers who are just ruining the party for everyone else.

If you have any other simple suggestions, please share in the comments below.